Quick Answer: Can As A Request?

What is a polite way to ask for money?

3 Ways To Politely Ask For The Money That Someone Owes YouYou can ask them what use they have put the money to.

This is obviously going to remind them that they owe you money, and in case it genuinely simply skipped their mind, the best case scenario will be that they return it right then and there.

Ask them to cover for you someplace.

Give them a polite reminder..

Why is it May I instead of can I?

But the permission use of can is not in fact incorrect in standard English. The only difference between the two verbs is that one is more polite than the other. In informal contexts it’s perfectly acceptable to use can; in formal situations it would be better to use may.

How do you politely ask for something in an email?

Email Etiquette: How to Ask People for Things and Actually Get a ResponseLead with the ask. … Establish your credibility. … Make the way forward clear. … If you’re asking a question, propose a solution. … Be scannable. … Give them a deadline. … Write your subject lines like headlines. … Edit your messages ruthlessly.More items…•

Can I request or request may?

In spoken English, a request for permission is generally answered with can, cannot, or can’t, rather than with may or may not, even if the question was formed using may. (Although mayn’t is a word, it looks and sounds strange even to native speakers.)

Can request sentences?

– I’m sorry, but I’m cold. Can we sit here? – Sorry, the seat’s taken. – I’m sorry, but you can’t.

What can I say instead of ask?

Synonymsbegged.beseeched.entreated.inquired.interrogated.prayed.pleaded.pled.

What should you say when you ask for something?

When you ask someone for something, or you ask them to do something for you, it is essential to be as polite as possible. Here are some ways that you can be polite. A “hello” and a smile go a long way! Say “hello” at the beginning of your request.

Can I and may I Difference?

May is the more formal word, and if you are at all concerned about being tut-tutted, a safe choice. Can is now the verb of choice for ability, and both can and may are still used in the “possibility” sense. You may use can if you wish, and you can use may if it makes you feel better.

How do you politely ask for something?

How to Ask for FavorsBe direct but polite. … Don’t make it sound bad. … Avoid guilt. … Don’t cross the line. … Show respect. … Avoid constant one-sided favors. … Be personal but straightforward. … Take “No” for an answer.More items…•

How do I make a request?

Making requests – asking someone to do something for you These are the three most common ways for making requests: “Could you open the door for me, please?” “Would you mind opening the door for me, please?” “Can you open the door for me, please?

How do you ask for something?

Follow These 9 Steps to Ask for What You Want (and Actually Get…Act as if you expect to get it. You need a solid level of certainty and expectation when you ask for something you want. … Ask someone who can give it to you. … Get the other person’s full attention. … Be clear and specific. … Ask from the heart. … Ask with humor and creativity. … Give something to get something. … Ask repeatedly.More items…•

Can could request?

We use the modal verbs can, could and would to offer to do things for people or to invite them to do something. We also use them to make requests or ask permission to do something. What are modal verbs? They are a type of auxiliary verb we use with other verbs to add more meaning to the verb.

Could is used for polite request?

A third modal for making polite requests is could. For example, “Could I please have some water?” Could is the past tense of can. However, when asking for permission, could does not have a past tense meaning. Could has the same meaning as may when making requests.

Can I humbly request?

This is not correct. Don’t use this phrase. You can request something, or you can request that someone do something. In this case, you would have to say, “I request that you.” Also, the word “humbly” sounds rather dated and is not often used in this context in North America.