Quick Answer: What Does Flaming Nora Mean?

Why do we say gone for a Burton?

Gone for a Burton is a British English expression meaning to be missing or to die.

The term was popularised by the RAF around the time of World War II.

It migrated to the USA quickly and in June 1943 a story titled Husky Goes Down for a Burton appeared in Boys’ Life, the magazine of the Boy Scouts of America..

Why do we say Bob’s your uncle and Fanny’s your aunt?

What does “Bob’s your uncle Fanny’s your aunt” mean? … “Bob’s your uncle” is slang, meaning: “There it is, there you have it”. Often extended to include “and Fanny’s your aunt”, it is often used when issuing a set of instructions or guidelines, in order to indicate how easy the instructions are to follow.

What is Kit and Kaboodle mean?

It commonly turns up in the whole caboodle, meaning “the whole lot”. It’s recorded in the US from the middle of the nineteenth century. It’s probable that the word was originally boodle, with the phrase being the whole kit and boodle, but that the initial sound “k” was added to boodle for euphony.

Where did the saying for crying out loud come from?

For crying out loud” is said to originate from the expression “for Christ’s sake.” How you get from “for Christ’s sake” to “for crying out loud” I don’t know, but I bet it has something to do with a father who was displeased with the incessant crying of his sprout. … And with that, the expression was coined.

Where does the expression Flaming Nora come from?

In the normal Cockney manner, the final ‘g’ and the opening ‘h’ were dropped to produce something that sounded like “flamin-orror” and that in turn over the years became “Flamin’ Nora!”…or “Bloody Nora” as a stronger alternative. So Nora wasn’t a person at all but the result of an accent.

What does Bloody Nora mean?

Interjection. (UK, vulgar) expression of surprise, contempt, outrage, disgust, boredom, frustration.

Why do people say Gordon Bennett?

The expression is primarily used in the UK even though Gordon Bennett was an American. It comes from the name of newspaperman James Gordon Bennett, Jr. (1841-1918). … The term Gordon Bennett alludes to his wild ways, and perhaps originated as a euphemism for gorblimey.

Why do we say my giddy aunt?

[Oh,] my giddy aunt! is used as a playful euphemism to avoid blasphemy and is thought to have derived from (if not quoted from) the farcical comedy Charley’s Aunt by Brandon Thomas that ran for 1,466 performances on its first production starting December 1892.

What does Heavens to Betsy mean?

Q From Mark Lord: I am looking for the origin and meaning of the phrase Heavens to Betsy. A The meaning is simple enough: it’s a mild American exclamation of shock or surprise. It’s dated, only rarely encountered in print and then most often as an evocation of times past.

Why do we say as happy as Larry?

The phrase happy as Larry seems to have originated as either Australian or New Zealand slang sometime before 1875. … Unlike other odd phrases — the Australian happy as a boxing kangaroo in fog time and the New Zealand happy as a sick eel on a sandspit come to mind — it was meant positively: extremely happy or content.

Where does life of Riley come from?

An easy life, as in Peter had enough money to take off the rest of the year and live the life of Riley. This phrase originated in a popular song of the 1880s, “Is That Mr. Reilly?” by Pat Rooney, which described what its hero would do if he suddenly came into a fortune.

What does Nora mean in Irish?

MEANING: A classic Irish name, it could be a shortened form of Eleanor meaning “torch” or could be from the Latin Honora meaning “honor, reputation” and became so popular in Ireland in the Middle Ages that many people assumed it was Irish. Noreen is the diminutive of Nora and means “little honourable one.”

What does bobs your uncle mean?

“Bob’s your uncle” is a phrase commonly used in Ireland, United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries that means “and there it is” or “and there you have it”. Typically, someone says it to conclude a set of simple instructions or when a result is reached. The meaning is similar to that of the French expression “et voilà!”

Where does kick the bucket come from?

Etymology. There are many theories as to where this idiom comes from, but the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) suggests the following: A person standing on a pail or bucket with their head in a slip noose would kick the bucket so as to commit suicide.

Why do we say dressed to the nines?

Still another clothing origin suggests that the phrase descends from the Old English saying “dressed to the eyes,” which, because Old English was weird, was written as “dressed to then eyne.” The thinking goes that someone at some point heard “then eyne” and mistook it for “the nine” or “the nines.”