Quick Answer: What Kind Of Doctor Treats Pinched Nerve?

Does a MRI scan show nerve damage?

MRI is sensitive to changes in cartilage and bone structure resulting from injury, disease, or aging.

It can detect herniated discs, pinched nerves, spinal tumors, spinal cord compression, and fractures..

How long does it take for pinched nerve to heal?

Most of the time, symptoms from a pinched nerve will start to feel better within 6 to 12 weeks of nonsurgical treatment.

Can a chiropractor fix a pinched nerve?

Chiropractic care for a pinched nerve includes re-aligning the spine to get you back to optimal health. There are so many stress factors that take place that can cause a pinched nerve, and chiropractors specialize in reducing that stress to treat pinched nerves as well as prevent them.

Can a pinched nerve last for months?

Everyone experiences pinched nerves to some degree in their lifetime. The human anatomy is such that it’s almost unavoidable. Most of the time they’ll resolve on their own, but the healing process can take weeks to months and can require treatment by a specialist and medication. Sometimes surgery is necessary.

What kind of doctor treats nerve pain?

A neurologist is a specialist who treats diseases in the brain and spinal cord (the central nervous system), peripheral nerves (nerves connecting the brain and spine to the organs, like the lungs or liver), and muscles.

Do pinched nerves go away on their own?

And rest assured: Most cases of pinched nerves go away on their own. However, there comes a point when you should seek medical attention for your back pain or neck pain caused by a pinched nerve. Watch out for these severe symptoms.

Who can fix a pinched nerve?

There are a variety of ways a person can relieve the pain of a pinched nerve at home.Extra sleep and rest. … Change of posture. … Ergonomic workstation. … Pain relieving medications. … Stretching and yoga. … Massage or physical therapy. … Splint. … Elevate the legs.More items…

Why does nerve pain get worse at night?

Neuropathic pain is sometimes worse at night, disrupting sleep. It can be caused by pain receptors firing spontaneously without any known trigger, or by difficulties with signal processing in the spinal cord that may cause you to feel severe pain (allodynia) from a light touch that is normally painless.