When Can My Spouse Collect Half Of My Social Security?

When should lower earning spouse claim Social Security?

Take it at the earliest age of 62 and it’s clipped by 25%.

A lower-earning spouse who claims a spousal benefit early also gets hit.

Instead of getting 50% of the higher earner’s full-retirement-age benefit, the lower earner claiming a spousal benefit at age 62 receives 35% of the higher earner’s benefit..

Can I draw on my husband’s Social Security at 62?

You can begin collecting spousal benefits at age 62, if your spouse has applied for benefits at that point. But an early retirement reduces your benefits. The amount of your benefit is reduced based on the number of months until you reach full retirement age.

Can I switch from my Social Security benefit to a spousal benefit?

En español | Only if your spouse is not yet receiving retirement benefits. In this case, you can claim your own Social Security beginning at 62 and make the switch to spousal benefits when your husband or wife files. … Again, Social Security will pay the greater of the two benefit amounts.

Can I collect spousal benefit and wait until I am 70 to collect my own Social Security?

En español | You can only collect spousal benefits and wait until 70 to claim your retirement benefit if all of the following are true: You were born before Jan. … You have reached your full retirement age. Your spouse is collecting his or her own Social Security retirement benefit.

Can you collect 1/2 of spouse’s Social Security and then your full amount?

You can receive up to 50% of your spouse’s Social Security benefit. You can apply for benefits if you have been married for at least one year.

Can my wife collect half of my Social Security?

When someone dies, their Social Security benefits may become available to their current or former spouse, depending on certain circumstances. But even if there’s no death, you can collect a Social Security spousal benefit equal to half of what your spouse gets, if that’s higher than what you’d get on your own.

What is the lowest Social Security retirement benefit?

Since 1973, the Social Security Administration has used an alternative way of determining benefits for low-income retirees known as the special minimum benefit….A special formula for minimum benefits.Years of CoverageSpecial Minimum Primary Insurance Amount11$40.8015$210.5020$423.5025$636.001 more row•Jun 28, 2016

Which spouse should claim Social Security first?

The higher earner is the spouse with the larger primary insurance amounts (PIA). When you’re deciding who will collect first and who should wait, consider having the lower earner collect first and having the higher earner wait.

When can a spouse collect spousal Social Security benefits?

62 yearsBenefits For Your Spouse Even if they have never worked under Social Security, your spouse may be able to get benefits if they are at least 62 years of age and you are receiving or eligible for retirement or disability benefits. Your spouse can also qualify for Medicare at age 65.

Can I collect both my Social Security and my spouse’s?

Can I collect spousal benefits if I earned my own Social Security benefit? En español | Technically, yes, you can receive both spousal benefits and your own retirement payment. As a practical matter, however, you’ll get the higher of the two amounts, and no more.

Which wife gets the Social Security?

number 5 below). wives and widows. That means most divorced women collect their own Social Security while the ex is alive, but can apply for higher widow’s rates when he dies. benefit on your record if you die before he does.

Can a person who has never worked collect social security?

Even if you’ve never had a job, you may still be eligible for Social Security benefits when you retire or become disabled. Social Security benefits are based on the amount of income you earned during your working life. … Not necessarily — thanks to the spousal benefits option.

When a husband dies does the wife get his Social Security?

When a retired worker dies, the surviving spouse gets an amount equal to the worker’s full retirement benefit. Example: John Smith has a $1,200-a-month retirement benefit. His wife Jane gets $600 as a 50 percent spousal benefit. Total family income from Social Security is $1,800 a month.